The City has fire rings at North Beach that get very busy during the summer. What is the City’s fire ring policy? How does the City monitor behavior at the fire rings and is it enough?

Coronado has eight, five-by-five-foot fire rings at North Beach. They are available on a first-come, first-served basis. City-provided fire rings are permitted uses per Coronado Municipal Code Section 86.38.020. In addition, Code Section 48.04.120 allows for fires to be built in a portable barbecue or other similar devices, however, coals used in any such barbecue device must be placed in a hot coal receptacle or fire ring before leaving. City officials have posted fire ring rules online and on signs at the beach. The rules are simple: The City requires beachgoers to use only clean wood or charcoal; no burning of pallets; no fire materials shall be placed higher than 12 inches above the upper edge of the fire ring; hot coals are to be placed in the proper receptacle, and anything brought on to the beach must be removed when leaving the beach. A few frequent beachgoers have expressed concern that cleaning crews don't arrive early enough and don't clean the sand thoroughly enough. The beach is inspected and cleaned every day of the year. Typically, crews arrive at the beach 7:15 am to assess the entire 2-mile-long coastline, looking for safety hazards first, then creating a plan to address other issues based on which locations, such as Central Beach, see the earliest visitors. Workers then begin cleaning the sand, sweeping the kelp, and removing trash. By 8 am, or earlier depending on the need, crews move to North Beach to pick up trash, sift the sand, and empty trash bins. Hot coal receptacles, which can be found throughout the beach, are emptied as needed. North Beach is typically cleaned by 9 am. The City also has received comments that the City does not stop all pallets from being burned at the beach, especially outside the summer season. This does happen on occasion, typically during slower times of the year after City Lifeguards have left for the day and when the Police Department conducts more random patrols. The use of pallets is prohibited due to the nails and sharp pieces of wood that can be left behind when they are broken up. During the busy summer season, the City hires security personnel who begin patrolling the North Beach fire rings on the Friday before the Memorial Day weekend. They are on hand through the Labor Day weekend. Uniformed security guards work every day from 5:30 pm to 11:30 pm to educate beach users about the beach and fire regulations and to report non-compliance to the Police Department, which also patrols the beach. The curfew for North Beach and vehicle parking on Ocean Boulevard is from 11 pm to 4 am. Security personnel takes photos every night of the fire ring area before ending their shifts and provide documentation of the beach condition and any interactions they have with fire ring users. They have access to a locked trash bin for the disposal and safekeeping of wood pallets intercepted at the beach. City Lifeguards also provide early morning inspections of the beach. They will locate and mark any fire debris from portable or illegal fires and report them to Public Services for clean-up. Those who witness any beach rule violations are asked to call the non-emergency Police Department line at 619-522-7350. If there is an actual emergency, call 911. To report any damage, illegal fire debris or trash that requires clean-up, call Public Services at 619-522-7380. Historically, Coronado had 18 fire rings until 1994, when City officials removed 10, increased the space between them and established a beach curfew. In January 2014, the City Council amended the Municipal Code to limit fires to charcoal and clean wood only and restricted fire material heights. The City consulted with the California Coastal Commission, which encouraged the protection of lower-cost visitor and recreational facilities, citing Section 30213 of the California Coastal Act. Current state legislation seeks to preserve beach fires.

View the Beach Fire Rings (PDF).

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1. Was the Coronado Senior Association moved out of the John D. Spreckels Center to make room for the City’s Cultural Arts senior management analyst?
2. Since the Spreckels Center does not have the word “senior” anywhere on the facility, does the City have a true “senior center” that addresses the needs of those 50 and older?
3. Do I have to recycle my food waste now that EDCO has announced its new Organic Recycling Program?
4. Why does the City waste money watering the synthetic turf at the Lawn Bowling Green?
5. Does the City’s affordable housing provider San Diego Interfaith Housing treat tenants in an arbitrary, unpredictable, discriminatory fashion and evict people without cause?
6. Are the current asphalt repairs simply “make-work” and unnecessary?
7. Are there fresh water aquifers in Coronado that could be used for a supply of potable water?
8. Did the City of Newport Beach successfully challenge a state law, Senate Bill 2, that mandates a city's zoning codes accommodate emergency shelters and transitional housing?
9. Did the new traffic signal at Alameda Boulevard and Fourth Street cause a back-up of traffic east of the intersection on Wednesday, November 6?
10. Does refinancing the former redevelopment agency’s bonds and loans create more density in Coronado?
11. Does the City’s affordable housing provider San Diego Interfaith Housing treat tenants in an arbitrary, unpredictable, discriminatory fashion and evict people without cause?
12. How can the City leave the lights on at the Coronado Public Library overnight especially during the current heat wave and with potential rotating outages?
13. How does a City get selected to Dr. Beach’s Top 10 Best Beaches in America list?
14. Is it true that enterococci bacteria can be caused by decaying kelp and why doesn’t the City think the current advisory at Avenida del Sol is related to sewage impacts from the Tijuana River or Mexico
15. Is the City going to make changes at Coronado Cays Park?
16. Is the City not respecting its beautiful historic sidewalks?
17. Is the City trying to extend San Diego’s Lindbergh Field into Coronado?
18. Is the water quality being affected in South Beach and is Central Beach being tested for the Fourth of July?
19. Is there still time to have a say on the Coronado Cays Park Master Plan?
20. It has been reported in national news stories based on a local report that the City of Coronado’s beach was closed for several weeks. Is that true?
21. Questions have come up in the community about what uses are allowed in the City of Coronado’s R-1A residential zoning code. What are those uses?
22. The City has fire rings at North Beach that get very busy during the summer. What is the City’s fire ring policy? How does the City monitor behavior at the fire rings and is it enough?
23. What are the white cones along the Silver Strand State Highway?
24. Is the National Citizen Survey conducted by the National Research Center valid?
25. What is the current status of the Golf Course Water Recycling and Turf Care Facility project or the environmental review? How are the potential environmental impacts being addressed?
26. What role does the City have in the redevelopment of the Coramart building and has the City prevented its redevelopment?
27. What was the odor in Coronado on Easter Sunday?
28. Why are there two construction sites at Spreckels Park? And why is the site near Seventh only a concrete pad?
29. Why is the City ending its participation in the Rotary Santa program?
30. Why isn’t the City extending service to the Cays this year?
31. Why were two palms recently removed from the beach?
32. Why is the Glorietta Bay Boat Launch Ramp closed and when will it reopen?